October 1, 2019

On Refusal, Hope and the Politics of Making Meaning

By Wendy Harcourt. Wendy Harcourt shares snapshots of a feminist political ecologist's life over the summer where she was able to reflect and think about different socio-natures together with colleagues/friends of the Well-being, Ecology, Gender and cOmmunity – Innovation Training Network (WEGO-ITN). Her light descriptions point to thicker moments of making meaning in conferences, courses and communities.
July 19, 2018

New Master's in Degrowth

The activist-academic collective Research & Degrowth has announced a new master's in Political Ecology, with a specialization in Degrowth and Environmental Justice.
July 17, 2018

We need to talk about robots

By Paul Robbins. A political ecology of robots is due, one that is rigorously empirical, dedicated to justice and animal welfare, but unromantic in every regard.
July 25, 2017

Climate politics in the long run

By Romain Felli*.  Stephen Schneider’s 1976 book The Genesis Strategy offers a stunning preview of contemporary debates over climate policies.  
April 27, 2017

“Namami Brahmaputra”: Worshipping a river, ignoring its materialities

By Mitul Baruah* The Brahmaputra river in Northeast India means many different things to the diverse communities in the region – their lifeline, recurrent and destructive flooding and erosion – but by most it is not considered holy. Mitul Baruah reflects on the anti-politics of recent attempts to Hinduize the river, which divorce it from its specific historical-material context.
April 14, 2017

The Banality of the Anthropocene

By Heather Anne Swanson* There are plenty of troubling things about the Anthropocene, but one of its most troubling dimensions is the sheer number of people it fails to trouble. In response, we need to trouble the Anthropocene’s banality, argues Heather Ann Swanson.
July 21, 2016

Mining, water appropriation and latent conflicts

What if environmental conflicts do not manifest themselves? The Cobre Las Cruces mining company has managed to access and control common water resources thanks to a top-down, technocratic version of science, which silences social conflict.*
June 21, 2016

Using art to study and communicate socio-environmental change in areas of land grabbing

By Emma Li Johansson* Art in research is a powerful tool to evoke feelings and actions beyond academia. This researcher set out to see what is possible when mixing research with artistic ways of expression.
May 26, 2016

Why is Bolivian mining still irresponsible?

A recently published study explores the reasons why the socio-environmental implications of mining have not improved under Evo Morales.
May 19, 2016

The Sun Rises – TOMORROW

By Alevgul Sorman* and David Merlaut** A review of the documentary Demain (Tomorrow). An enchanting journey about confronting challenges for transforming the dominant narratives in our society.
April 28, 2016

Nancy Peluso on Maids and other Mobile Subjects: Remaking Forests and Agrarian Environments in Indonesia

By Nancy Peluso* Reflections on the everyday dimensions of landscape production, agrarian transformation and the movement of capital that take place through the migrations and mobilities of landless women from the mountains of East Java.
April 26, 2016

Whose game is it anyway? Critical reflections on anti-poaching narratives

by Benedict Singleton* We need to find or create media narratives that don’t depend on shock and crisis. Designating particular hunting practices as poaching is an inherently political act, which is not always simple or just. ‘Hunting the elephant hunters’ was the title of an email I received recently. It invited me to contribute money to the Eagle Network, an organisation that investigates and campaigns against environmental crime. What gave me pause was that whilst the (short) message I received had information about the scale […]
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