October 5, 2021

On the Racist Humanism of Climate Action*

By Diego Andreucci and Christos Zografos. Mainstream climate change mitigation and adaptation policies are imbued with neocolonial discursive constructions of the “other”. Understanding how such constructions work has important implications for how we think about emancipatory and socially-just responses to the climate crisis.
June 22, 2021

Colonial Climates, Decolonial Futures: Reflections from Puerto Rico

Gustavo García López. A decolonial future requires naming the interconnections between the climate crisis and imperialism, seen in dramatic North-South inequalities, extractivist policies, corporatocracy, and militarism; while simultaneously reimagining climate as part of struggles for making collective worlds of justice, freedom, and interdependence, caring for our shared commons, in common.
April 9, 2021

How imaginaries shift in places: Native and settler politics of water and salmon

By Cleo Woelfle-Erskine. The latest installment of the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water” discusses how new eco-cultural imaginaries can emerge from alliances for river restoration between ranchers-conservationists, salmon scientists, and Tribal natural resource staff. 
June 30, 2020

There’s more than just dirt beneath the lush lawns

By Lauren Tropeano Australia’s colonial water histories run deep and flow into the present. The nation’s lush lawns are anything but apolitical.
June 16, 2020

Countering water colonialism: Indigenous peoples’ rights, responsibilities and international water governance frameworks

By Kat Taylor, Sheri Longboat and Quentin Grafton. Water governance frameworks need to harmonise with United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
March 15, 2019

The Loneliest Man on Earth

by Juan Francisco Moreno “Economic efficiency” in the use of natural resources without concern for the justice of its distribution, or the scale of its extraction is just bad fiction, just like the story of the internalization of externalities. Hopelessly, the exploitation of the Amazon has always entailed a process of dispossession of those whose existence doesn’t count for capital.
February 26, 2018

More Shamans, less intolerance! An Indigenous Manifesto at Berlin Film Festival

by Felipe Milanez The premier of the movie Ex-Shaman by Luiz Bolognesi at the 68th Berlin International Film Festival becomes the occasion for spreading a manifesto by Indigenous People of Brazil denouncing racism, violence and the loss of traditional knowledge: Shamans must exist and be respected, before it is too late, the world is devoid of spirituality and the Skies fall upon our heads The magic of the forest came to the winter of Berlin, bringing stories of violence and genocide, of evangelical proselytism, intolerance […]
November 8, 2017

Trespass. An environmental history of modern migrations

by Marco Armiero In a new book, Marco Armiero and Richard Tucker have edited together important contributions to the emerging field of the environmental history of modern migrations. Three main ‘styles’ of research delineate the contours of a timely research effort. Histories in the Present Tense We are in the midst of a massive migration crisis when Europe is transforming itself into an impenetrable fortress. The times when walls were falling and barbed wires removed seem so far away. Everywhere rich nations are trying to […]
May 18, 2017

Negotiating longing and despair as frontier citizens of the Indian State

By Mabel Gergan * Mabel Gergan reflects on the shifting relationship between the Indian State and its North-Eastern and Himalayan frontier, exploring the colonial roots of racial discrimination in Indian cities and activist critiques of ongoing development interventions in the region.
January 12, 2017

El trabajo (barato) migrante en la agricultura neoliberal

Por Yoan Molinero Gerbeau * y Gennaro Avallone ** Los trabajadores migrantes son cada vez más esenciales para el mantenimiento de la agricultura global, un pilar fundamental del sistema capitalista.
December 22, 2016

Protecting nature in an unequal world

By Prakash Kashwan* Democracies can do better than to give into the mirage of “Wilsonian Enclosures”, which envision half of the planet or more in nature reserves. The excessive focus on such areas detracts attention from developing alternative conservation strategies.
September 8, 2016

Struggles over urban greenspace in San Juan, Puerto Rico: Reconnecting ecology and democracy

The story of how a small group of neighbors in the suburbs of San Juan, Puerto Rico, came together to beautify their neighbourhood and restore a small remnant of forest by planting trees; and how in the process of their struggle, they become ‘politicized’ and integrated into a larger movement challenging the political economy of urban growth.
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