Collection of posts that speak to each other on a specific topic in Political Ecology.

September 15, 2020

Rural and urban, green and red, against eco-austerity

By Patrick Bresnihan. In the fourth essay of the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water”, we learn how understanding some of the common roots of the anti-water charges and beef farmer movements in Ireland, may help us to re-imagine, remember and reclaim a form of environmental politics that is from below, popular, and has justice at its core.
August 18, 2020

A swimming commons

By Elliot Hurst. The summer episode of the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: from extractivism to commoning” co-organized by the Undisciplined Environments and FLOWs blogs, explores swimming as a political act to reclaim social and ecological justice.
July 21, 2020

Scaling-up territorial alternatives to water extractivism: Mini hydroelectric plants in Ecuador

By Emilie Dupuits In the second post of series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: From extractivism to commoning” ,co-organized by the Undisciplined Environments and FLOWs blogs, Emilie Dupuits discusses controversies and challenges in scaling-up social struggles for water conservation and sustainable livelihoods in the Intag Valley, Ecuador.
June 16, 2020

Countering water colonialism: Indigenous peoples’ rights, responsibilities and international water governance frameworks

By Kat Taylor, Sheri Longboat and Quentin Grafton. Water governance frameworks need to harmonise with United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
June 9, 2020

Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: From extractivism to commoning

By Gustavo García-López, Irene Leonardelli and Emanuele Fantini A new open Series co-organized by the Undisciplined Environments and FLOWs blogs looks at struggles over more just and ecological water presents and futures.
June 2, 2020

Are ‘Nature-based Solutions’ an answer to unsustainable cities or a tool for furthering nature’s neoliberalisation?

By Panagiota Kotsila. Nature-based Solutions (NBS) are broadly perceived as positive ‘triple-win’ strategies, though they have so far shown contradictions and limited transformational potential for advancing environmental justice and sustainability in cities. We can, however, recover the underlying idea of respecting and protecting biodiversity as well as caring for and with nature to repair or transform some of our broken systems.
May 15, 2020

What the Radical Right Thinks About Climate Change

By Bernhard Forchtner Accusations of irrationalism, leveled against those in favor of climate change policies, make up the single most prominent argument.
May 13, 2020

Political ecologies of the far right: An introduction to the series

By Santiago Gorostiza. A new open Series that critically examines the far-right connections to environmental narratives and actions in the context of socioecological crisis.
May 13, 2020

Far Right Ecologism and the Conceptual Deficiencies of Ecofascism

By Balsa Lubarda. 'Ecofascism' is insufficient to capture the connection between the far right and ecological thought. In order to better grasp the elusive engagement of contemporary far right with the environment today, we must take the theoretical debate further by introducing 'Far Right Ecologism' (FRE).
April 21, 2020

Will Cleveland’s greening efforts perpetuate racial inequalities?

By Margarita Triguero-Mas. If equity is not made a priority, Cleveland’s vision of becoming a “green city on a blue lake” risks falling victim to the injustices of green gentrification felt in similar revival cities across the US.
March 24, 2020

How one of Montréal’s poorest neighborhood became ripe for green gentrification

By Melissa García Lamarca. Greening projects both large and small in the rapidly developing Saint Henri neighborhood are stitching together a post-industrial landscape to create new and exclusionary forms of urban living.
February 18, 2020

Can trees address environmental inequities in Mediterranean cities? 

By Amalia Calderón-Argelich, Francesc Baró, Johannes Langemeyer and James Connolly While the uneven distribution of street tree benefits in Barcelona favors elderly residents in particular and partially compensates for the lack of larger green spaces in several districts, it is clear that street trees must be accompanied by other sustainable mobility measures to advance urban environmental health and justice.
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