Collection of posts that speak to each other on a specific topic in Political Ecology.

September 13, 2022

The gendered consequences of ‘undone science’ in a pesticide-contaminated area in Nicaragua

By Grettel Navas The impacts of the pesticide DBCP on women are largely understudied in comparison to infertility in male workers which is well documented. What are the gendered consequences of this 'undone science' and how are these shaped by ingrained power dynamics within local workers organisations?
July 5, 2022

Political Ecologies of Pesticides: An introduction

By Lucia Argüelles. A new series of contributions builds on the discussions taking place around political ecologies of pesticides in the 2022 Dimensions of Political Ecology Conference (DOPE).
June 7, 2022

Public Water Services in times of emergency: the case of the Covid19 outbreak

By Gemma Gasseau. The book “Public Water and Covid-19: Dark Clouds and Silver Linings”, discusses how the Covid19 outbreak has underlined once again the importance of water and other basic services for human life, and re-opened the debate on the role of the state in managing such services.
May 24, 2022

Conflicts over the memorialization of water in Barcelona: A temporal turn in political ecology

By Lucia Alexandra Popartan and Camil Ungureanu. As part of the current global trend towards the “museification” of water and processes of re-municipalization, the politics of memory of hydraulic infrastructures and water resources has become a key battleground between corporations and transformative socio-political movements. These struggles in cities such as Barcelona show the relevance of complementing the spatial turn in political ecology and urban geography with a temporal turn.
February 17, 2022

Exposing eco-nationalists with premodern ecologies: a medievalist approach to the French far right

By Antonella Sciancalepore Scratching the surface of contemporary French far-right manifestos, we find superficial reproduction of medieval ideas about geographical bio-determinism and ethnic identification with nature. Ironically, when theorizing their version of “patriotic ecologies”, the far-right steps into a tradition that says exactly the opposite of what they would like to say: in relation to the environment, all humans are migrants.
October 19, 2021

Reclamando el derecho a la autogestión del agua

Por Marcela Olivera y Stefano Archidiacono Veinte años después de la Guerra del Agua en Cochabamba (Bolivia), reflexionamos sobre la “autogestión” del agua como dimensión práctica y cultural de los bienes comunes. Una nueva pieza para la serie “Reimaginar, recordar y reclamar el agua: Del extractivismo al procomún”.
October 19, 2021

Autogestión, reclaiming the right to self-management of water

By Marcela Olivera and Stefano Archidiacono Twenty-one years after the Water War in Cochabamba (Bolivia), we reflect on “autogestión” of water as a practical and cultural dimension of the commons. A new piece for the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: From extractivism to commoning”.
September 7, 2021

White Skin, Black Fuel: On the Danger of Fossil Fascism

By The Zetkin Collective. What happens when the rise of temperatures intersects with the rise of the far right? This latest instalment in the "Political ecologies of the far right" series, based on the new book White Skin, Black Fuel, seeks an answer.
July 20, 2021

Where have all the commons gone in Italy? A new podcast

By Emanuele Fantini In Italy, the success of the referendum against water privatisation pushed many social movements to reframe their struggles – on labour, education, debt, land use…. – in the name of the commons. Emanuele Fantini explores the legacy of that season in a podcast, here presented for the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: From extractivism to commoning”.
June 17, 2021

Transforming capitalism? The role of the commons and direct democracy in struggles against water privatisation in Europe.

By Andreas Bieler In his new book “Fighting for Water: Resisting Privatization in Europe” Andreas Bieler analyses the struggles against water privatization in Europe since the early 1990s. In this post for the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: From extractivism to commoning” he explores to what extent these struggles point towards a potential future beyond capitalism.
June 1, 2021

Portland’s Lauded Sustainability Falls Short on Racial Justice

By Margarita Triguero-Mas, Mario Fontán-Vela. Despite Portland’s reputation as a champion of sustainability, the city still struggles to overcome its legacy of racist policies and environmental injustice when it comes to the inclusion of Black residents.
May 27, 2021

Commoning through blogging: Reflections on our “Reimagining, remembering and recommoning water” series

By Irene Leonardelli, Gustavo García López and Emanuele Fantini. In two webinars at the IASC 2021 Water Commons Virtual Conference (19-21 May 2021), past and future contributors reflected on the joint UndEnv-FLOWs series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: From extractivism to commoning”.