November 17, 2020

Not a “wasted” enterprise: political ecologies of wastewater wetlands in Kolkata

By Jenia Mukherjee and Amrita Sen Jenia Mukherjee and Amrita Sen reflect on multiple ways of knowing, experiencing and engaging with wastewater in East Kolkata Wetlands (India). This plurality offers original insights into a provocative question:  is wastewater always toxic, polluting and hazardous? A new post of the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: from extractivism to commoning”.
October 15, 2020

From the commons to extractivism and back: The Story of Mahakam River in Indonesia

By Siti Maimunah and Sarah Agustiorini Increasing pressures from extractive industries on the Mahakam River in Kalimantan,  the second largest river in Indonesia, risk an irreparable destruction of a commons. Yet residents are actively organizing to reclaim the river as a common living space, as Siti Maimunah and Sarah Agustiorini illustrate in this new post of the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: from extractivism to commoning”.
September 15, 2020

Rural and urban, green and red, against eco-austerity

By Patrick Bresnihan. In the fourth essay of the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water”, we learn how understanding some of the common roots of the anti-water charges and beef farmer movements in Ireland, may help us to re-imagine, remember and reclaim a form of environmental politics that is from below, popular, and has justice at its core.
August 18, 2020

A swimming commons

By Elliot Hurst. The summer episode of the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: from extractivism to commoning” co-organized by the Undisciplined Environments and FLOWs blogs, explores swimming as a political act to reclaim social and ecological justice.
July 21, 2020

Scaling-up territorial alternatives to water extractivism: Mini hydroelectric plants in Ecuador

By Emilie Dupuits In the second post of series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: From extractivism to commoning” ,co-organized by the Undisciplined Environments and FLOWs blogs, Emilie Dupuits discusses controversies and challenges in scaling-up social struggles for water conservation and sustainable livelihoods in the Intag Valley, Ecuador.
June 30, 2020

There’s more than just dirt beneath the lush lawns

By Lauren Tropeano Australia’s colonial water histories run deep and flow into the present. The nation’s lush lawns are anything but apolitical.
June 9, 2020

Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: From extractivism to commoning

By Gustavo García-López, Irene Leonardelli and Emanuele Fantini A new open Series co-organized by the Undisciplined Environments and FLOWs blogs looks at struggles over more just and ecological water presents and futures.
May 22, 2020

In Defence of Blue Degrowth

Maria Hadjimichael & Irmak Ertör. A recent special issue critically interrogates the rapidly expanding "Blue Growth" imperative – and proposes an alternative imaginary for the use of, access to, and social relations with the seas and oceans.
July 18, 2019

Between drought and monsoon: the embodied hardship of seasonal work in Maharashtra’s sugar cane plantations

by Irene Leonardelli. At the end of a too-long, extremely dry summer, rural women from the drought-prone district of Beed, Maharashtra, finally return home, after six months of seasonal employment in sugar cane plantations. Encountering them allows me to reflect on experiences of drought and monsoon and on the embodied implications of environmental and agrarian transformation. 
November 22, 2018

Heterotopias and a serious joke at IHE Delft library

by Cristóbal Bonelli With the notion of heterotopia Foucault describes spaces that are somehow “different”, mirroring and yet distinguishing themselves from what is outside, like gardens, cemeteries, or ships. Heterotopias are places of imagination, escape, otherness and a microcosm of different environments. Cristobal Bonelli found his own heterotopia in the IHE library, during the presentation of the book “Water, Technology and the Nation-State”.
March 22, 2018

Why are water wars back on the agenda? And why we think it’s a bad idea!

On the occasion of world water day, this opinion piece critically reflects on the recent resurgence of the “water wars” narrative in policy and media circles and questions its timing, purpose and the evidence on which it is based. 
December 21, 2017

A conversation about Gramsci on the Nile

By Emanuele Fantini, Filippo Menga and Ana Elisa Cascão Tensions escalated recently between Ethiopia and Egypt around the construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD). In this controversy, the media is not only the space where the conflict publicly unfolds, but also one of the main players in shaping it. A few months ago, the authors started a conversation on these topics. Now, it continues here. Emanuele:  At the end of October, I attended for the first time the Nile Basin Development Forum and […]
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