April 9, 2021

How imaginaries shift in places: Native and settler politics of water and salmon

By Cleo Woelfle-Erskine. The latest installment of the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water” discusses how new eco-cultural imaginaries can emerge from alliances for river restoration between ranchers-conservationists, salmon scientists, and Tribal natural resource staff. 
January 19, 2021

Rooted Water Democracies and Water Justice 

By Jeroen Vos and Rutgerd Boelens. Transnational water movements often mutually complement with place-based forms of collective water management. This may enhance grounded and equitable water provision, and shape political advocacy of common resources control at multiple scales.
January 14, 2021

The Many Faces of Municipalisation

A long-term historical perspective on a city’s infrastructures can reveal radically diverse agendas behind the call for municipalisation.
December 9, 2020

“There is no future here”: the psychological burden of water scarcity

By Maja Ženko and Filippo Menga Water scarcity negatively impacts mental health of the affected water users through various pathways.  
November 17, 2020

Not a “wasted” enterprise: political ecologies of wastewater wetlands in Kolkata

By Jenia Mukherjee and Amrita Sen Jenia Mukherjee and Amrita Sen reflect on multiple ways of knowing, experiencing and engaging with wastewater in East Kolkata Wetlands (India). This plurality offers original insights into a provocative question:  is wastewater always toxic, polluting and hazardous? A new post of the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: from extractivism to commoning”.
October 15, 2020

From the commons to extractivism and back: The Story of Mahakam River in Indonesia

By Siti Maimunah and Sarah Agustiorini Increasing pressures from extractive industries on the Mahakam River in Kalimantan,  the second largest river in Indonesia, risk an irreparable destruction of a commons. Yet residents are actively organizing to reclaim the river as a common living space, as Siti Maimunah and Sarah Agustiorini illustrate in this new post of the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: from extractivism to commoning”.
September 15, 2020

Rural and urban, green and red, against eco-austerity

By Patrick Bresnihan. In the fourth essay of the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water”, we learn how understanding some of the common roots of the anti-water charges and beef farmer movements in Ireland, may help us to re-imagine, remember and reclaim a form of environmental politics that is from below, popular, and has justice at its core.
August 18, 2020

A swimming commons

By Elliot Hurst. The summer episode of the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: from extractivism to commoning” co-organized by the Undisciplined Environments and FLOWs blogs, explores swimming as a political act to reclaim social and ecological justice.
July 21, 2020

Scaling-up territorial alternatives to water extractivism: Mini hydroelectric plants in Ecuador

By Emilie Dupuits In the second post of series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: From extractivism to commoning” ,co-organized by the Undisciplined Environments and FLOWs blogs, Emilie Dupuits discusses controversies and challenges in scaling-up social struggles for water conservation and sustainable livelihoods in the Intag Valley, Ecuador.
June 30, 2020

There’s more than just dirt beneath the lush lawns

By Lauren Tropeano Australia’s colonial water histories run deep and flow into the present. The nation’s lush lawns are anything but apolitical.
June 9, 2020

Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: From extractivism to commoning

By Gustavo García-López, Irene Leonardelli and Emanuele Fantini A new open Series co-organized by the Undisciplined Environments and FLOWs blogs looks at struggles over more just and ecological water presents and futures.
May 22, 2020

In Defence of Blue Degrowth

Maria Hadjimichael & Irmak Ertör. A recent special issue critically interrogates the rapidly expanding "Blue Growth" imperative – and proposes an alternative imaginary for the use of, access to, and social relations with the seas and oceans.
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