February 21, 2017

Capitalism, democracy, and the degrowth horizon (Part II)

By Leandro Vergara-Camus* In the Part II of the third post of the Ecology after capitalism series, Leandro Vergara-Camus attempts to show that Marxism is useful for the degrowth movement because of its understanding of what the specificity of capitalism is in comparison to other types of societies. In order to build a post-capitalist society, he calls for challenging private ownership of the means of production, de-commodifying and democratising the access to and management of natural resources, challenging the separation of the economic from the political, […]
February 14, 2017

Capitalism, democracy, and the degrowth horizon (Part I)

By Leandro Vergara-Camus* In the third post of the Ecology after capitalism series, divided in Part I and Part II, Leandro Vergara-Camus argues that the root causes of the socially and ecologically destructive character of capitalism is not to be found in growth, but in capitalist accumulation. He suggests that growth can be greened in a post-capitalist society if the institutions and dynamics that force capitalist accumulation and competition are abolished and full democracy is established.
February 7, 2017

Beyond the limits of nature: a social-ecological view of growth and degrowth

By Eleanor Finley* In this second article of the series “Ecology after capitalism“, Finley revisits the concept of growth from the libertarian socialist perspective of social ecology. She draws on Bookchin’s work to interrogate the limits of a degrowth conception of ‘growth’ and argues that we might find more opportunities for social and political transformation in social ecology’s analysis of post-scarcity and growth as ecological development. 
January 24, 2017

Ecology after capitalism

A series of upcoming posts on ENTITLEBlog seeks to foster emerging debates around egalitarian futures beyond accumulation and growth.
January 17, 2017

Ecología política del turismo

La revista Ecología Política acaba de publicar su Número 52, dedicado al turismo.
January 10, 2017

Let’s Degrow Up and Grow Down!

By François Schneider * François Schneider responds to Miklos Antal’s criticism of the use of the term degrowth for the alternative economics movement.
November 30, 2016

Agroecología: ¿institucionalizando la alternativa?

By Inés Morales Bernardos, Jon Sanz Landaluze y Marian Simón Rojo* La irrupción de las candidaturas populares, alimentadas por gentes de los movimientos sociales, ha abierto en el movimiento agroecológico nuevas perspectivas de interacción con las instituciones.
November 2, 2016

Encountering Arturo Escobar

By Isabella M. Radhuber* Workshops were recently held in Barcelona with Arturo Escobar to discuss two of his key texts. Isabella shares some important reflections on the social and political role of researchers, what it means to place oneself as an academic and how we, more broadly, understand and relate with the world.
October 25, 2016

Naming the radical movement for alternative economics: D.E.growth

By Miklós Antal* How can we create a positive attitude towards alternative economic directions while keeping the advantages of the concept of degrowth?
October 12, 2016

Accelerationism… and degrowth? Strange bedfellows for today’s left

By Aaron Vansintjan* Proponents of degrowth and accelerationism will likely be found in the same room for decades to come. Despite their opposite ‘branding’, they should probably talk; they have a lot to learn from each other.
September 15, 2016

Tensions and utopias: Bolivian environmental politics under Evo Morales

By Anna Kaijser* Capitalist ‘culture of death’ vs. an alternative ‘culture of life’? Recent environmental politics in Bolivia manifest contradictory tendencies and the entanglement of environmental matters with issues of territory, natural resources and national identity.
September 13, 2016

Rosia Montana's movement for democratic justice

Rosia Montana is a small village in Transylvania, Romania, where, for the last fourteen years, a Canadian corporation has been pushing for the development of what would be the largest open cast cyanide-use gold mine in Europe. In the 1990s, Rosia Montana was declared mono-industrial, not allowing for any other form of business than mining to be developed by locals. Under this pressure, the majority of Rosieni were discouraged and disillusioned, ultimately conceding their displacement by selling their lands and properties. People have been told […]
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