September 20, 2022

Unsettling (water) scarcity one raindrop at the time: Learning from the Revitalised Rainfed Agriculture Network in India

By Arianna Tozzi. Rainfed areas of India, where agriculture is reliant on seasonal rainfall, are often associated with drought-prone territories characterised by endemic water scarcity to be fixed by expanding irrigation. Tracing the historical roots beneath these naturalised scarcity framings, Arianna Tozzi discusses how the work of a grassroot network provides a space to reimagine an alternative paradigm for rainfed regions that values their diversity and variability.
September 13, 2022

The gendered consequences of ‘undone science’ in a pesticide-contaminated area in Nicaragua

By Grettel Navas The impacts of the pesticide DBCP on women are largely understudied in comparison to infertility in male workers which is well documented. What are the gendered consequences of this 'undone science' and how are these shaped by ingrained power dynamics within local workers organisations?
July 14, 2022

Alcarrás and the normalization of farmers’ disappearance

By Lucia Arguelles Ramos.  The success of the film Alcarás has to do with a widespread imaginary that romanticizes family farming but at the same time normalizes its disappearance.
July 5, 2022

Political Ecologies of Pesticides: An introduction

By Lucia Argüelles. A new series of contributions builds on the discussions taking place around political ecologies of pesticides in the 2022 Dimensions of Political Ecology Conference (DOPE).
February 22, 2022

Sub-Saharan migrants transiting through Algeria: Migratory farm labor in Covid times

By Meriem Farah Hamamouce and Amine Saidani The agricultural sector in Algeria relies on the informal labor force of Sub-Saharan migrants on their way to Europe. Interviews with migrants highlight their precarious conditions of life and work, worsening during the Covid-19 health crisis.
November 26, 2020

Experiences of the Covid19 pandemic of small-scale farmers in the Draa Valley in the South-East of Morocco

By Lisa Bossenbroek, Hind Ftouhi, Abir Benfars and Nawal Taaime How do small-scale farmers and agricultural laborers in the Draa Valley, in the South-East of Morocco, experience and respond to the Covid19 crisis? Their experiences illustrate how the crisis tests their resilience and expose the vulnerability and the limited resources some rural actors have to deal with crises. 
September 29, 2020

Building Eco-Paradise in End Times: Lessons from Ecoaldeas (Ecovillages) in Mexico

By Olea Morris. What might it mean to be “self-sustainable” in a world that is more connected than ever?
September 15, 2020

Rural and urban, green and red, against eco-austerity

By Patrick Bresnihan. In the fourth essay of the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water”, we learn how understanding some of the common roots of the anti-water charges and beef farmer movements in Ireland, may help us to re-imagine, remember and reclaim a form of environmental politics that is from below, popular, and has justice at its core.
May 5, 2020

A pandemic of blindness: uneven experiences of rural communities under COVID-19 lockdown in India – Part II

By Irene Leonardelli, Arianna Tozzi, Enid Still and Sandeep Kumar In part II of our series on the uneven experiences and everyday challenges of lockdown conditions in India, activist-researchers Seema Kulkarni and Sneha Bhat are interviewed about their work on the frontlines of COVID-19 relief efforts for migrants and women farmers in Maharashtra. 
April 30, 2020

A pandemic of blindness: uneven experiences of rural communities under COVID-19 lockdown in India – Part I

By Enid Still, Sandeep Kumar, Irene Leonardelli and Arianna Tozzi  A two part series on the uneven experiences and everyday challenges of lockdown conditions in India. Reflections and insights from women and small-scale farmers, migrant workers and civil society activists in Tamil Nadu and Maharashtra point to a systemic blindness of the state and economic system, which fail to see, understand or respond to the struggles of the most marginalised people in the country.
July 18, 2019

Between drought and monsoon: the embodied hardship of seasonal work in Maharashtra’s sugar cane plantations

by Irene Leonardelli. At the end of a too-long, extremely dry summer, rural women from the drought-prone district of Beed, Maharashtra, finally return home, after six months of seasonal employment in sugar cane plantations. Encountering them allows me to reflect on experiences of drought and monsoon and on the embodied implications of environmental and agrarian transformation. 
July 17, 2018

We need to talk about robots

By Paul Robbins. A political ecology of robots is due, one that is rigorously empirical, dedicated to justice and animal welfare, but unromantic in every regard.