November 26, 2020

Experiences of the Covid19 pandemic of small-scale farmers in the Draa Valley in the South-East of Morocco

By Lisa Bossenbroek, Hind Ftouhi, Abir Benfars and Nawal Taaime How do small-scale farmers and agricultural laborers in the Draa Valley, in the South-East of Morocco, experience and respond to the Covid19 crisis? Their experiences illustrate how the crisis tests their resilience and expose the vulnerability and the limited resources some rural actors have to deal with crises. 
September 29, 2020

Building Eco-Paradise in End Times: Lessons from Ecoaldeas (Ecovillages) in Mexico

By Olea Morris. What might it mean to be “self-sustainable” in a world that is more connected than ever?
September 15, 2020

Rural and urban, green and red, against eco-austerity

By Patrick Bresnihan. In the fourth essay of the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water”, we learn how understanding some of the common roots of the anti-water charges and beef farmer movements in Ireland, may help us to re-imagine, remember and reclaim a form of environmental politics that is from below, popular, and has justice at its core.
May 5, 2020

A pandemic of blindness: uneven experiences of rural communities under COVID-19 lockdown in India – Part II

By Irene Leonardelli, Arianna Tozzi, Enid Still and Sandeep Kumar In part II of our series on the uneven experiences and everyday challenges of lockdown conditions in India, activist-researchers Seema Kulkarni and Sneha Bhat are interviewed about their work on the frontlines of COVID-19 relief efforts for migrants and women farmers in Maharashtra. 
April 30, 2020

A pandemic of blindness: uneven experiences of rural communities under COVID-19 lockdown in India – Part I

By Enid Still, Sandeep Kumar, Irene Leonardelli and Arianna Tozzi  A two part series on the uneven experiences and everyday challenges of lockdown conditions in India. Reflections and insights from women and small-scale farmers, migrant workers and civil society activists in Tamil Nadu and Maharashtra point to a systemic blindness of the state and economic system, which fail to see, understand or respond to the struggles of the most marginalised people in the country.
July 18, 2019

Between drought and monsoon: the embodied hardship of seasonal work in Maharashtra’s sugar cane plantations

by Irene Leonardelli. At the end of a too-long, extremely dry summer, rural women from the drought-prone district of Beed, Maharashtra, finally return home, after six months of seasonal employment in sugar cane plantations. Encountering them allows me to reflect on experiences of drought and monsoon and on the embodied implications of environmental and agrarian transformation. 
July 17, 2018

We need to talk about robots

By Paul Robbins. A political ecology of robots is due, one that is rigorously empirical, dedicated to justice and animal welfare, but unromantic in every regard.
November 15, 2017

Sustainable integration? Nexus thinking and the foreclosure of progressive eco-politics

by Joe Williams The water-energy-food nexus has become a powerful framework for sustainable development that seeks to integrate the management of resource sectors for increased efficiency. However, its current mobilisation is fundamentally de-politicising, overlooking the contradictions and injustices of resource governance The water, energy and food sectors are, of course, deeply connected. Agriculture accounts for around 70% of total freshwater use globally. Huge amounts of energy is consumed in withdrawing, treating, transporting, using and disposing of water. The food production and supply chain uses about […]
October 25, 2017

Confronting authoritarian populism: challenges for agrarian studies

by Ian Scoones Four points for scholarly research in rural contexts, in order to better understand the political reconfigurations and the socio-cultural dynamics linked to new forms of authoritarian populism Last week I was in Russia at the fascinating fifth BRICS Initiative in Critical Agrarian Studies conference. Throughout the event we heard about the emergence of particular styles of authoritarian populist regimes, including in the BRICS countries, but elsewhere too. Based on my remarks at the final plenary, I want to ask what the challenges are for agrarian studies in confronting […]
April 25, 2017

Tania Murray Li: The agricultural story is not over

Tania Murray Li talks about how and why political ecology should still focus on rural spaces and transformations.
April 14, 2017

The Banality of the Anthropocene

By Heather Anne Swanson* There are plenty of troubling things about the Anthropocene, but one of its most troubling dimensions is the sheer number of people it fails to trouble. In response, we need to trouble the Anthropocene’s banality, argues Heather Ann Swanson.
February 23, 2017

Xingu, the clamor coming from the forest in Rio de Janeiro’s Carnival

By Barbara Arisi & Felipe Milanez * Much to the chagrin of ranchers and agribusiness, one of Rio de Janeiro’s popular samba schools, Imperatriz Leopoldinense, is making visible the terrible consequences of agribusiness and hydropower dams on the Xingu Indigenous Park in this year’s Carnival.
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