October 12, 2021

Dune and the Inhuman Agency of Commoning

By Riccardo Buonanno. The new sci-fi epic Dune is a planetary narrative. Human affairs only represent a part of a whole geopower, in which Planet’s forces organize, incite and deform social and political relations. Is it time to reconsider our certainties on the human agency facing environmental crisis?
July 20, 2021

Where have all the commons gone in Italy? A new podcast

By Emanuele Fantini In Italy, the success of the referendum against water privatisation pushed many social movements to reframe their struggles – on labour, education, debt, land use…. – in the name of the commons. Emanuele Fantini explores the legacy of that season in a podcast, here presented for the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: From extractivism to commoning”.
June 17, 2021

Transforming capitalism? The role of the commons and direct democracy in struggles against water privatisation in Europe.

By Andreas Bieler In his new book “Fighting for Water: Resisting Privatization in Europe” Andreas Bieler analyses the struggles against water privatization in Europe since the early 1990s. In this post for the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: From extractivism to commoning” he explores to what extent these struggles point towards a potential future beyond capitalism.
May 27, 2021

Commoning through blogging: Reflections on our “Reimagining, remembering and recommoning water” series

By Irene Leonardelli, Gustavo García López and Emanuele Fantini. In two webinars at the IASC 2021 Water Commons Virtual Conference (19-21 May 2021), past and future contributors reflected on the joint UndEnv-FLOWs series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: From extractivism to commoning”.
April 9, 2021

How imaginaries shift in places: Native and settler politics of water and salmon

By Cleo Woelfle-Erskine. The latest installment of the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water” discusses how new eco-cultural imaginaries can emerge from alliances for river restoration between ranchers-conservationists, salmon scientists, and Tribal natural resource staff. 
January 19, 2021

Rooted Water Democracies and Water Justice 

By Jeroen Vos and Rutgerd Boelens. Transnational water movements often mutually complement with place-based forms of collective water management. This may enhance grounded and equitable water provision, and shape political advocacy of common resources control at multiple scales.
October 6, 2020

Community Gardens, Gentrification, and Placekeeping in Minneapolis

By Kelsey Poljacik and Rebecca Walker. The newest contribution to the “Green Inequalities in the City” series analyzes the complex relationship between community gardens and gentrification in Minneapolis, and the choices and tensions community leaders face in shaping the impact these gardens have on their neighborhoods.
August 18, 2020

A swimming commons

By Elliot Hurst. The summer episode of the series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: from extractivism to commoning” co-organized by the Undisciplined Environments and FLOWs blogs, explores swimming as a political act to reclaim social and ecological justice.
August 6, 2020

Saving a critical pastureland in Montenegro from the onslaught of military ‘development’

By Pablo Domínguez, Maja Kostić-Mandić and Milan Sekulović The “Save Sinjajevina” initiative  is mobilizing to defend the Sinjajevina-Durmitor massif mountain range, a traditional pastoral territory in Montenegro, from being converted into a military training ground.
July 21, 2020

Scaling-up territorial alternatives to water extractivism: Mini hydroelectric plants in Ecuador

By Emilie Dupuits In the second post of series “Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: From extractivism to commoning” ,co-organized by the Undisciplined Environments and FLOWs blogs, Emilie Dupuits discusses controversies and challenges in scaling-up social struggles for water conservation and sustainable livelihoods in the Intag Valley, Ecuador.
July 9, 2020

The Can Batlló radical social innovation: Movements co-producing public services

By Viviana Asara. Barcelona's Can Batlló platform is a radical social innovation enacting a democratized public ownership and management of public services. By blending confrontational repertoires of action with a radical politics of autonomy, movement activists and citizens intervene and decide on the planning and delivery of public services, governing them as commons, while struggling against austerity policies.
June 9, 2020

Reimagining, remembering, and reclaiming water: From extractivism to commoning

By Gustavo García-López, Irene Leonardelli and Emanuele Fantini A new open Series co-organized by the Undisciplined Environments and FLOWs blogs looks at struggles over more just and ecological water presents and futures.
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